Groupon promo pays tribute to 'President Hamilton'

No, he was never president

Groupon promo pays tribute to 'President Hamilton'

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Groupon, the deal website, has launched a Presidents Day promotion of $10 off $40 when customers buy a deal for a local business. The promo honors President Alexander Hamilton, who appears on the $10 bill, because he is "undeniably one of our greatest presidents and most widely recognized for establishing the country's financial system," Groupon says in a press release.

Only one problem: Alexander Hamilton was never president of the United States.

Hamilton, the nation's first secretary of the Treasury, was killed by Vice President Aaron Burr in a pistol duel.

"President Hamilton is best known for the fiscal sensibilities that led him to author economic policies, establish a national bank and control taxes," the press release says.

When asked to respond to the fact that Hamilton was never president, a spokesperson for Groupon, Erin Yeager, replied by email: "We'll just have to agree to disagree." The email included a PDF list of all U.S. presidents. Hamilton is not on the list.

The jokey tone of Yaeger's email, the press release, as well a mysterious new Twitter account would seem to point to a deliberate ploy for attention.

(Job well done.)

Groupon Tweeted a link to the new Twitter account called "Prez Alex Hamilton," which features the bio "Founding Father. On the $10 bill. Maybe bad with pistols. Lover of a good deal."

The account's first Tweet was at 2:15 p.m. Friday.

"There appear to be a lot of misleading reports about me lately, but I do in fact have another face hidden underneath my wig. #HonestyHour," Prez Hamilton Tweeted.

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