Short-lived dust storm brings down temps - MyFoxAustin.com | KTBC Fox 7 | News, Weather, Sports

Short-lived dust storm brings down temps

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PHOENIX -

A dust storm temporarily grounded some flights out of Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport and knocked out electricity to about 2,000 customers in the San Tan Valley and Queen Creek areas Friday afternoon.

It also dumped a little bit of rain in the east valley and lowered temperatures slightly. Humidity remains high.

Take a look at the video from SkyFOX as the storm rolled through the southeast valley early Friday afternoon.

The storm moved through Sky Harbor Airport, Tempe and Scottsdale as it moved northwest.

Visibility in some parts of the storm was down to a quarter of a mile.

Officials at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport halted some flights until wind gusts of up to 60 mph subsided. At least one plane diverted to Phoenix Sky Harbor. Airport officials say flight operations were back to normal by 2 p.m. Thursday.

The National Weather Service's preparedness actions:

  • If you encounter blowing dust or blowing sand on the roadway or see it approaching, pull off the road as far as possible and put your vehicle in park.
  • Turn the lights all the way off and keep your foot off the brake pedal.

Salt River Project officials say about 2,000 of their customers in the San Tan Valley and Queen Creek area went without electricity at the height of the storm. By 5 p.m., power had been restored to most customers.

Current conditions from our live tower cam: www.myfoxphoenix.com/live3

Video: FOX 10's Kristen Keogh, Jessica Flores, Marc Martinez, and Dave Munsey have team coverage.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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