How to stay safe in extreme heat - MyFoxAustin.com | KTBC Fox 7 | News, Weather, Sports

How to stay safe in extreme heat

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As sweltering summer heat becomes the norm in Central Texas, FOX 7's Alex Villarreal takes a look at what people can do to protect themselves outside in the heat.

The sun is shining and it's not quite 100 degrees. In other words, it's the perfect setting for an outdoor run.

"Pretty good. Nice and warm," said my running partner, Matthew Navarro.

He's feeling pretty confident two miles in.

"You feel loose. Your stride opens up. You feel like you can continue going at that pace. It's kind of like a second wind," Matt added.

Still, medical experts say we should have downed two glasses of water before hitting the trail. The bird's eye view shows Matt and I are pretty much in the sun during the entire run.

I asked, "Wishing you had more water?"

Matt replied, "Wishing I had more water."

"Your heart rate increases. Your pulse rate quickens. Your blood pressure may elevate slightly. Your core body temperature starts to go up at that point," said Dr. Albert Gros, the Chief Medical Officer for St. David's South Austin Medical Center.

"Every 30 to 40 minutes you should have another glass of water, come inside, take a quick break," Gros added.

Dr. Gros says water can help anyone avoid heat exhaustion.

If you run outside in the heat like we did, you need to find some way to cool down quickly, like an outdoor shower or by taking a quick dip.

We called it quits out at four and a half miles. Even with my hat, I'm starting to get a bit of a headache.

Dr. Gros explained, "That's one of the body's responses when you're in heat stress."

Matt added, "A little bit of the noodle feeling in the legs. They feel weak. I would say thirsty, my lips feel a little chapped."

"That's a classic example of heat exhaustion, those are the signs that at that point you need to slow down or stop the activity and get into a cooler place," explained Dr. Gros.

This would also be a good time to hydrate with more water or something with electrolytes.

Matt said, "Another hour, not happening,"

The sun is shining and it's not quite 100 degrees.  In other words, it's the perfect setting for an outdoor run.

 

"Pretty good.  Nice and warm," said my running partner, Matthew Navarro.

 

He's feeling pretty confident two miles in.

 

"You feel loose.  Your stride opens up.  You feel like you can continue going at that pace.  It's kind of like a second wind," Matt added.

 

Still, medical experts say we should have downed two glasses of water before hitting the trail.  The bird's eye view shows Matt and I are pretty much in the sun during the entire run.

 

I asked, "Wishing you had more water?"

 

Matt replied, "Wishing I had more water."

 

"Your heart rate increases.  Your pulse rate quickens.  Your blood pressure may elevate slightly.  Your core body temperature starts to go up at that point," said Dr. Albert Gros, the Chief Medical Officer for St. David's South Austin Medical Center.

 

"Every 30 to 40 minutes you should have another glass of water, come inside, take a quick break," Gros added.

 

Dr. Gros says water can help anyone avoid heat exhaustion.

 

If you run outside in the heat like we did, you need to find some way to cool down quickly, like an outdoor shower or by taking a quick dip.

 

We called it quits out at four and a half miles.  Even with my hat, I'm starting to get a bit of a headache.

 

Dr. Gros explained, "That's one of the body's responses when you're in heat stress."

 

Matt added, "A little bit of the noodle feeling in the legs.  They feel weak.  I would say thirsty, my lips feel a little chapped."

 

"That's a classic example of heat exhaustion, those are the signs that at that point you need to slow down or stop the activity and get into a cooler place," explained Dr. Gros.

 

This would also be a good time to hydrate with more water or something with electrolytes.

 

Matt said, "Another hour, not happening,"

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