Judge: Ex-Texas district attorney acted improperly

Judge: Ex-Texas district attorney acted improperly

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In 1987, Michael Morton was convicted of murdering his wife the year before.

Nearly 25 years behind bars later, DNA evidence showed he didn't even do it.

It pointed to a guy named Mark Norwood. Morton was set free.

Norwood was convicted of the crime in March.

So what went wrong?

At a court of inquiry in February, it was argued that District Judge Ken Anderson, the District Attorney at the time had withheld some pretty important evidence.

Mainly a transcript of a conversation between Christine Morton's mother and an investigator -- describing how Morton's then 3-year-old son had told her a "monster hurt mommy" and that his dad wasn't even home.

Neighbors also reported there was a suspicious green van near the Morton home before the murder...something else Ken Anderson didn't bring to light.

On Friday, Judge Louis Sturns from Fort Worth issued an arrest warrant for Anderson charging him with criminal contempt of court, tampering with evidence and tampering with government records.

58-year-old Michael Morton knows that sinking feeling.

"I'm probably one of the very few people who has a modest understanding of how Ken Anderson feels right now. What he's going through. However, more importantly there is transparency in the system and there's accountability. We all should stand up for what we've done and said and that no one's above the law," Morton said.

Morton says we can't change the past but we can prevent these problems in the future.

"I said that I don't want Ken Anderson's head on a stick and that's true. The system's gonna do what the system does. But hopefully this will make it somewhat easier and give some motivation for our state legislators to pass a few bills that are before them right now that will make sure that what happened to me wouldn't happen to you," Morton said.

Judge Sturns set a $2,500 bond on each of the charges against Anderson.

Anderson's legal team said they will fight the charges.

Shortly after the hearing, Anderson turned himself in.

We did receive a statement from Williamson County D.A. Jana Duty.

She says Judge Anderson presides over a third of the felony cases filed in the county.

Due to the conflict of interest in light of Friday's ruling, she's requesting Attorney General Greg Abbott step in as Attorney Pro-Tem.

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