Christie vetoes state-run health exchange bill - MyFoxAustin.com | KTBC Fox 7 | News, Weather, Sports

Christie vetoes state-run health exchange bill

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TRENTON, N.J. (AP) -- New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has vetoed legislation establishing a state-run health insurance exchange in line with the Affordable Care Act.

But he says in his veto message he has not eliminated any of the options available to states to comply with the national health overhaul sometimes referred to as "Obamacare."

Christie says it would be irresponsible to decide now without knowing how much each option will cost.

The states have until Dec. 14 to decide whether to establish a state-based exchange. They can also partner with the federal government or let the feds run the state exchange.

Health insurance exchanges are online marketplaces where uninsured residents can shop for health care coverage.

The Republican governor is in Washington on Thursday to lobby for Superstorm Sandy aid.

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