Hurricane Sandy aftermath and unexpected bipartisanship

Hurricane Sandy aftermath and unexpected bipartisanship

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NEWARK, NJ -

On Wednesday, President Obama toured New Jersey with Gov. Chris Christie.  Christie, a Republican, praised the President as they looked at the damage on the Jersey shore.

The bipartisan tone seems almost jarring coming in the closing days of a political campaign marked by partisan bickering and attack advertising.

"He has worked incredibly closely with me since before the storm hit," said Christie.  "And I cannot thank the President enough for his personal concern and compassion for our state and the people of our state."

The kind words form a key Mitt Romney backer, more proof politics is unpredictable.

"This storm remarkably has changed the profile, the media profile of the remaining days of the campaign," said Kevin Demenna, a political consultant.

Republican consultants says the Romney campaign can deal with Christie's warm feelings toward Barack Obama.

"Sometimes you get dealt hands in campaigns you cannot do anything about. Governor Romney has to understand Christie has to work with a Republican White House..I am sure he would rather be working with an Obama White House," said Chuck Coughlin.

And anyway, they say, the storm's political fallout won't change the results of the election.

"Some would argue the states it has hit are not in play, so the outcome will be the same regardless of the storm," said Lisa James.

It is true most of the storm damage has been in blue states, but some swing states -- Ohio and Virginia, have also been affected.

And it's also true voters from around the country are watching what is happening in the northeast in the wake of Superstorm Sandy.

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